Dissertation Abstract:
My dissertation develops a novel account of the imagination and its link to human freedom through a reassessment of the theoretical relationship between Sartrean existentialism and Freudian-Lacanian psychoanalysis. Throughout his career, Sartre is hostile to psychoanalytic theory due to its purported arguments against human freedom. I argue that by focusing on the concept of imagination as it is elaborated in the work of Sartre, Freud, and Lacan, surprising points of similarity are revealed between a Sartrean philosophy of freedom and Freudian-Lacanian psychoanalysis. I develop a nuanced conception of the link between imagination and human freedom according to which the imagination is both a liberating capacity of mind and responsible for numerous psychical pathologies. In this way, I demonstrate the ways in which psychoanalytic theory challenges many standard philosophical accounts of imagination and how psychoanalysis can be productively integrated with such accounts.
Committee: James B. South (Chair), Michael Monahan (Memphis), Curtis Carter, Thomas R. Flynn (Emory University)
Journal Articles
"Unconscious Structure in Sartre and Lacan." Forthcoming in Psychoanalytische Perspectieven.
                                                
"The Debate between Grunbaum and Ricoeur: The Hermeneutic Conception of Psychoanalysis and the Drive for Scientific Legitimacy." Ricoeur Studies/Etudes Ricoeuriennes Vol. 7, No. 1 (2016), pp. 103-119. [pdf]
"Toward a Non-Reductive Naturalism: Combining the Insights of Husserl and Dewey" William James Studies Vol. 7, No. 1 (2016), pp. 19-35. [pdf]
Book Reviews
Adrian Johnston, Irrepressible Truth: On Lacan's "The Freudian Thing".  In Continental Philosophy Review.
Jonathan Lear, Wisdom Won from Illness: Essays in Philosophy and Psychoanalysis. In Metapsychology Online Reviews
Benedict O'Donohoe (ed.) Severally Seeking Sartre. In Contemporary French Civilization
Theodore Gracyk, On Music. In American Society for Aesthetics Graduate E-Journal
Dominic McIver Lopes, A Philosophy of Computer Art. In American Society for Aesthetics Graduate E-Journal